The documentary you must see | ‘Abducted in plain sight’, available on Netflix

Among the hundreds of ‘true crimes’ available in Netflix, it is difficult to find a series or film of the genre that avoid hackneyed conventions up to ‘stomachache’. Fulanito appears murdered and the main suspect will end up being innocent after endless litigation or a culprit as real as it is unlikely will end up turning the investigation upside down. Therefore, it is to be appreciated when in the midst of content bulimia a story like that of ‘Abducted in Plain Sight, which deviates from almost all conventions except the one about the damn talking head.

Released on Netflix in January 2019, ‘Abducted in Plain Sight‘-whose translation would be’ Kidnapped in broad daylight’- part of the victim’s own story, something unusual in a genre in which it is usually either the criminals themselves or the investigators and the media who lead the narrative thread. The documentary film goes back to a much more naive and optimistic society: the America’s suburbs in the 70sSymbols of the progress and growth of the purchasing power of the middle class, in the last blows of the hippy movement and in a fertile time for the satanic cults and the new age sects.

Pocatello (Idaho) is then a city of less than 60,000 inhabitants in the Midwest, full of low brick houses with front gardens perfectly trimmed to place the star and bar flag. And in one of those houses lives the the Broberg family: the parents Roger and Mary and the daughters Jan, Karen and Susan. It is they themselves, the protagonists, who tell the story of Jan Broberg’s kidnapping when he was 12 years old. The story is so insane it would be hard to believe if it weren’t for the shame, the guilt and the pain it is almost palpable in each of the testimonies. In addition, Jan’s parents, who have been the subject of much criticism, admit their bad behavior in the face of the events.

The dosing of the documentary information invites the viewer to make your own guesses and try to anticipate. But it is impossible to foresee the absolutely unhinged twists and turns of this intrigue of kidnapping, sexual abuse, prostitution, aliens, coming out of the closet, double lovers and more. Everything sordid and bizarre mixed in a cocktail that, sometimes, by being bizarre, diverts attention from the fact that we are facing a real crime and that the victim was just a teenager. It also hits the dissociation between the public image of those involved -model and very religious family- in the face of turbulence that hides behind the Brobergs’ door.

The american Skye Borgman directs this documentary by 90 minutes whose plot starts with the arrival of the family’s neighborhood Berchtold, whose father, RogerHe quickly becomes very good friends with the Brobergs, especially with Jan. Roger, little by little, becomes indispensable for all of them and ends up spending even the nights at his neighbors’ house. Everyone admires him and affectionately calls him ‘B’. “It was like a second father to me“says Jan 2017, excited. relationship between ‘B’ and Jan would set off all the alarmsExcept for the Brobergs, alienated in a kind of seductive influx. The relationship between the girl and the adult goes beyond any limits of the conventional, but the family does not seem to find anything strange beyond a certain peculiarity in the personality of a Roger whom they idolize. Until one day ‘B’ decides to pick Jan up from piano class and the girl disappears. The development of the case is incredible today and the response of the victim’s parents can only be explained from the masterful manipulation of a man who ends up blowing up all family ties in the same way as the guru of a sect would. The family archives are assembled with direct testimonies from those involved forty years later – the destructuring caused by the appearance of ‘B’ in their lives is perceived – and with the reconstructions in 8 mm that perhaps give the film a greater sense of fiction than reality. A little pill that demonstrates the limitlessness of a bad man’s manipulation and abuse.

Among the hundreds of ‘true crimes’ available in Netflix, it is difficult to find a series or film of the genre that avoid hackneyed conventions up to ‘stomachache’. Fulanito appears murdered and the main suspect will end up being innocent after endless litigation or a culprit as real as it is unlikely will end up turning the investigation upside down. Therefore, it is to be appreciated when in the midst of content bulimia a story like that of ‘Abducted in Plain Sight, which deviates from almost all conventions except the one about the damn talking head.

Article: Soure