Djimon Hounsou opens up about the King’s Man’s incredible but demanding action sequences

British filmmaker Matthew Vaughn has a knack for creating spectacular action sequences, as evidenced by The Kingsman : les services secrets and Kick ass. But the stunts, especially the sword fighting, in his latest film, The king’s man, has proven difficult even for a veteran action star like Djimon Hounsou. In an interview with ComicBook.com, Hounsou said the following:

“Well the biggest challenge had to do with the physical nature of the action streak, and we had tremendous help and were guided by the stunt team. Our body doubles were absolutely amazing, you couldn’t tell the difference between when I walk in and when my stuntman takes over. But that said, it was such a difficult scene to shoot, very, very difficult. Of course, she has her emotional roller coaster. I mean, the story, the emotional drama of the father and son was played out throughout this sequence. But it was a very nice challenge and certainly one that is rewarding to watch the finished product. ”

Djimon Hounsou describes here a particular scene which is a bizarre mixture of dance and combat. Hounsou, who plays a key role in The king’s man as Shola, a trusted ally and friend of Ralph Fiennes’ Duke of Oxford, Orlando, struggled to film the aforementioned scene. But the 57-year-old actor managed to pull it off unscathed and, along with his co-star Rhys Ifans (who plays Rasputin), delivered a fight scene that is both hilarious and exhilarating. You can see it for yourself in the following clip, released by 20th Century Studios.

45seconds.fr VIDEO OF THE DAY

Located during World War I, The king’s man is a 2014 prequel Kingsman : les services secrets, which in turn was based on the comic book by Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons, Secret service. The king’s man takes place a century before the events of the 2014 film and focuses on creating the titular spy organization. The king’s man features a star cast including Ralph Fiennes, Gemma Arterton, Rhys Ifans, Matthew Goode, Tom Hollander, Harris Dickinson, Daniel Brühl, Djimon Hounsou and Charles Dance. Matthew Vaughn directed the film from a screenplay he wrote with Karl Gajdusek.

The official synopsis of The king’s man “As a collection of the worst tyrants and criminal minds in history come together to prepare for a war to annihilate millions of people, one man must race against time to stop them. Discover the origins of the very first independent intelligence agency in The King’s Man. ”

Having been delayed for two years, The king’s man was finally released on December 22 in the United States. So far, the film has received polarizing reviews from critics. The highly stylized and exaggerated action sequences are the highlight of The king’s man, but the film drew critics for its confusing tone and poor writing. Plus, he’s been sandwiched between two other blockbusters, Spider-Man: No Path Home and The matrix: resurrections. Comment The king’s man will be box office price remains to be seen. But even if it underperforms, a lucrative future awaits the Kingsman franchise. Several spin-offs and sequels are in development, with Matthew Vaughn attached as producer or director.

As for Djimon Hounsou, he recently appeared in A Quiet Place, Part II. In addition, he is one of the few actors to have been a part of the Marvel and DC films. Hounsou recently reprized his role as Korath from guardians of the galaxy, Marvel What if…?. Hounsou will also star in Shazam! Fury of the gods, reprising his role as a wizard from the first film.


Jason Momoa defends superhero genre against Martin Scorsese's earlier criticisms

Jason Momoa defends superhero genre against Martin Scorsese’s earlier criticisms

Aquaman 2 star Jason Momoa explains why he loves the genre and why they are important to him.

Read more

About the Author

45seconds is a new medium, do not hesitate to share our article on social networks to give us a solid boost. 🙂

We want to give thanks to the writer of this short article for this amazing web content

Djimon Hounsou opens up about the King’s Man’s incredible but demanding action sequences