Clint Eastwood inspires defenders of the Vosges forest

We were all marked by a very hot summer and trying events, in particular the fires that affected the Vosges mountains. It even seems that we have taken a step forward in raising awareness of the consequences of climate change with events very close to us: the fires at Ménil, Biffontaine, Brouvelieures, or the pumping of Lake Gérardmer in August to respond to the lack of water. In “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”, we learn from the mouth of Clint Eastwood that “the world is divided into two categories, those who have a loaded gun and those who dig”. That’s pretty much it on the subject of climate change, there are those who have a full reservoir of ideas and those who dig our graves a bit quickly, telling us that everything is over. The problem is that in the first category, we don’t all agree on the solutions. But we will remain optimistic, we will find a lot of common ground and new ideas. In this regard, I recommend the France 5 report “Bad weather for the planet. Heat stroke on the Vosges mountains”.

The program, exciting and instructive, is still replayed on the France 5 website.

The report is balanced, between a rather dramatic observation, the forest is suffering, it is clear, but with solutions and people who act, often in the shadows: scientists, elected officials, business leaders, firefighters , ONF agents, all at the bedside of this forest. We hear the Vosges scientist Marie-Claire Pierret explain that a certain number of extreme phenomena, such as droughts or storms, have always existed but are intensifying and becoming more frequent. We also discover in this report that many think and act to preserve the forest and create the forest of tomorrow with, for example, the establishment of more resilient species. We also observe the reflection on new forms of tourism or production in the wood industry. In short, we are far from the controversies maintained by the professionals of the clash, that certain politicians and certain media adore, we are there in a more serious register, that of reflection and invention. I recall in this regard, and to end on a lighter note, that it was a Vosgien, winner of the Lépine competition, Didier Munier, who invented the rotating barbecue tongs, very practical so as not to burn themselves, usable by Mr. as per Madame, so that the barbecue (which also raises the question of the overconsumption of meat and its impact on the emission of CO2 into the atmosphere) is not just a macho affair. I think I’ll give it to Sandrine…

We would like to give thanks to the author of this write-up for this remarkable material

Clint Eastwood inspires defenders of the Vosges forest